take a pill

vb
American
to relax, luxuriate. The phrase was pop-ularised by the 1992 US film Wayne's World.

Contemporary slang . 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • pill — [ pıl ] noun count * a small piece of solid medicine that you swallow with water: sleeping/contraceptive/vitamin pills take a pill: Did you remember to take your pills this morning? pill for: The doctor prescribed some pills for the pain. a. the… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • pill — n. tablet of medicine 1) to swallow, take a pill 2) (colloq.) to pop pills 3) a headache; sleeping pill oral contraceptive 4) to take the pill 5) to be on the pill misc. 6) it was a bitter pill to swallow ( it was very difficult to experience… …   Combinatory dictionary

  • pill — 01. Hilary was quite surprised to discover her 17 year old daughter is on the [pill]. 02. She is quite ill, and has about five different [pills] she has to take every day. 03. After taking sleeping [pills] for a few months, she found she could no …   Grammatical examples in English

  • pill */ — UK [pɪl] / US noun [countable] Word forms pill : singular pill plural pills a small piece of solid medicine that you swallow with water sleeping/contraceptive/vitamin pills pill for: The doctor gave me some pills for the pain. take a pill: Did… …   English dictionary

  • Pill, the — Commonly called "the pill," combined oral contraceptives are the most commonly used form of reversible birth control in the United States. This form of birth control suppresses ovulation (the monthly release of an egg from the ovaries)… …   Medical dictionary

  • take — takable, takeable, adj. taker, n. /tayk/, v., took, taken, taking, n. v.t. 1. to get into one s hold or possession by voluntary action: to take a cigarette out of a box; to take a pen and begin to write. 2. to hold, grasp, or grip: to take a book …   Universalium

  • take — I. verb (took; taken; taking) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English tacan, from Old Norse taka; akin to Middle Dutch taken to take Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. to get into one s hands or into one s possession, power, or… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • take — [[t]teɪk[/t]] v. took, tak•en, tak•ing, n. 1) to get into one s hands or possession by voluntary action: Take the book, please[/ex] 2) to hold, grasp, or grip: to take a child by the hand[/ex] 3) to get into one s possession or control by force… …   From formal English to slang

  • pill — noun take one pill at bedtime Syn: tablet, capsule, caplet, cap, gelcap, pellet, lozenge, pastille, horse pill; Veterinary Medicine bolus …   Thesaurus of popular words

  • Pill — Pill, v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p. {Pilled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pilling}.] [F. piller, L. pilare; cf. It. pigliare to take. Cf. {Peel} to plunder.] To rob; to plunder; to pillage; to peel. See {Peel}, to plunder. [Obs.] Spenser. [1913 Webster] Pillers… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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